Traveling dog

Traveling dogSometimes, staying active on a trip can seem like a tall order. But there’s evidence that you’re more likely to keep moving and get physical activity more frequently if you bring your four-legged companion along with you.

If you have never brought your dog on a flight before, you probably have a ton of questions about how to do so. It’s actually not as complicated as you may think.

It is important to note that the Humane Society doesn’t recommend taking your dog on a plane unless it’s absolutely necessary. Air travel can be dangerous for dogs with “pushed in” faces, including bulldogs and pugs. Their short nasal passages make them vulnerable to oxygen deprivation and heat stroke.

So, if you’re planning your next vacation and considering bringing your pet with you, here’s what you need to know.

Crating your dog
You might feel bad crating your dog, but they don’t mind the crate and some even feel safer when they’re in one. Before you put them in their crate to travel, make sure your dog has been well exercised and goes to the bathroom. Your dog will be more inclined to rest in the crate if he or she has burned off excess energy.

You should also make sure there’s nothing in the crate that can harm your dog, especially leashes and loose collars.

Getting on a plane
First and foremost, check with your airline to find out what their rules are regarding pet travel – you don’t want to be surprised at the airport. Since your dog will most likely be traveling in a crate, put him or her in the crate before you even enter the airport. This will keep your dog away from the inevitable airport chaos.

If you have a small dog, most airlines will let you bring him or her in the cabin for an additional fee. But you should call the airline in advance because there’s a limit to how many animals are allowed in the cabin during a flight. Also, check to make sure your dog meets the size requirement for this option.

You don’t want to start your dog’s trip on a full stomach or bladder, so let them fast for at least six hours. And make time for a pit stop as close to your departure time as possible.

You should make sure your dog has access to water while traveling. It should be enough to keep them hydrated, but not full.

You can bring your dog’s blanket or favorite toy or any item that’s familiar to your dog that will comfort and relax him during the trip.

After you land
Once your plane lands and you reunite with your pooch, take him on a long walk. It will let him stretch his legs and relax. Not to mention that taking a walk after sitting on a plane will also be great for you.

Photo from bradleyolin.

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About The Author

Nicole Jenet is a writer at Scribewise. There's nothing she loves more than the feeling of warm sand beneath her feet and trying new, exotic cuisine. Visit www.scribewise.com.

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